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Category: Trust/Validation Tips

  [5] Trust/Validation Tips 1 2  
Trust Must be Earned (Here's a Few More Ways to Earn It) #1243

Here is another way to help customers trust your company:

3. Consider how you attract people willing to support you. Does your company draw in supporters through flashy/controversial ads? If so, then you might have fickle customers. They might not stick around through the rough times.

Does your company attract supporters through "tech talk" and manipulate phrases? If so, then your customers might become suspicious. No matter how many fancy words and seemingly-great-sounding ideas you use, not everyone will believe you. Loyal customers might depart, or challenge your ad campaigns.

3.40 (10)

Thanks to: WebmastersTips.com Admin - Chicago - U.S.A. - rec.:Mar 25, 2008 - pub.:Mar 25, 2008

 

Trust Must be Earned (Here's How to Earn It) #1225

Before people buy, they need to trust. Let's be honest -- if no one is willing to trust your business, then you will have little to no success. Therefore, here are a few ways to help customers trust your company:

1. Promises which you don't break. Your business needs to follow through on everything which it promises. If your company consistently under-performs and betrays expectations, then it will almost certainly fail.

2. Positive name recognition. There is no way that you can prevent people from complaining about your business. (And no, you should not attempt to silence them.) However, you need to do as much as possible to keep your brand name in good standing. It's your job to ensure that the general public believes that your company has strengths, and your product has merit. When people hear your product's name, their reaction should be positive.

3.50 (4)

Thanks to: WebmastersTips.com Admin - Chicago - U.S.A. - rec.:Feb 26, 2008 - pub.:Feb 26, 2008
"Last, Best Hope" Syndrome #1238

If you (as a customer) pin your hopes to an unfinished product, or to a company which is developing new products, then you face the risk of disappointment. I know, I know... it's easy to believe that certain things are "the ones you've been waiting for," especially if they're still being created. Furthermore, it's tempting think that if those seemingly promising things don't turn out excellent, then you won't have anything else to look forward to. In those cases, it can be easy to declare that such products are the final remaining source of hope.

The lesson to learn here is that you shouldn't place high expectations on items which are still being made. Instead, put modest expectations on several products. If only one of them succeed, then you will only feel slightly let down.

3.50 (4)

Thanks to: Alan R. - Chicago - U.S.A. - rec.:Mar 14, 2008 - pub.:Mar 14, 2008
Has It Always Been a Matter of Trust? #1443

Customer loyalty: has it always depended on trust? I believe the answer is yes. Here are a few reasons why.

Reason 1 -- loyalty can't be bought. Maybe some people can be bribed to become friends... but that's not a good thing. If you have to throw around money in order to gain supporters, then that sets a bad precedent. People who are motivated by money might be quite fickle. They could be enticed by someone else's more lucrative offer.

Reason 2 -- what drives loyalty? Perhaps it's excellent service which can't be found elsewhere. Perhaps it's a company's unwavering commitment to its principles. Perhaps it's consistently delivering unmatched products. Or more likely, it's all three of these notions, and a few more. Trust is closely tied with each idea.

Reason 3 -- what happens when people don't trust your company? Think about it. They could be inclined to spread bad customer experiences, negative news, and even rumors. People who find it difficult to trust you won't be inclined to buy from you. Maybe they'll take effort to look elsewhere.

3.00 (3)

Thanks to: Anonymous - U.S.A. - rec.:Mar 13, 2009 - pub.:Mar 13, 2009
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